Smathermather's Weblog

Remote Sensing, GIS, Ecology, and Oddball Techniques

Archive for December, 2014

OpenDroneMap — Orthophotos and Textured Mesh

Posted by smathermather on December 22, 2014

Textured mesh of Langley Dataset from Aaron Racicot

Textured mesh of Langley Dataset from Aaron Racicot

Good news to report, though I haven’t finished my own testing yet… but OpenDroneMap, which previously would just create point clouds from drone images, now also produces:

  1. Meshes!
  2. Textured meshes!
  3. Georeferenced textured meshes (if the exif data has geographic coordinates)
  4. Georeferenced orthophotos! (if the exif data has geographic coordinates)

Now, I’d like those ifs to go away, but that requires a bit of thoughtful interface work. In the mean time, give it a whirl on your data.

Work left to do:

  • Refine processing chain
  • Allow for input of GCPs for images without GPS in their exif
  • Blending / brightness correction, etc. of input images
  • Digital surface model output

See this branch on github for the whole package : https://github.com/OpenDroneMap/OpenDroneMap. A special thanks to Spotscale (http://www.spotscale.com/) for undertaking and executing this work.

(Just integrated with the main branch January 20, 2015)

These are Spotscale’s screenshots. I’m re-running on my own test machine for validation as we speak (so to speak):

Textured mesh of Seneca test dataset (flown by Fred Judson and others of ODOT with Sensefly Swinglet). Ignore curves-- they are all in the no-data areas.

Textured mesh of Seneca test dataset (flown by Fred Judson and others of ODOT with Sensefly Swinglet). Ignore curves– they are all in the no-data areas.

odm_orthphoto

Orthophoto of Seneca test dataset (flown by Fred Judson and others of ODOT with Sensefly Swinglet).

 

Posted in 3D, Bundler, Camera Calibration, Conference, FOSS4G, FOSS4G 2014, Image Processing, OpenDroneMap, Optics, Photogrammetry, PMVS | 3 Comments »

Moar guitarz

Posted by smathermather on December 22, 2014

More images tonight of guitarmaking. This tenor guitar is going to be pretty snazzy, I think. This is my second non-geo + guitar post. See this link https://smathermather.wordpress.com/2014/12/15/and-now-for-something-completely-different-guitarmaking-by-a-geo-geek/ for the previous.

Walnut Back, ready to joint. Wood on one side, and the aluminum on the other serve to contrain the boards horizontally. Two sticks are temporarily inserted under the board pieces to elevate them. Hot hide glue is slathered onto the edge, and then the two boards drop into place with gravity.

Walnut Back, ready to joint. Wood on one side, and the aluminum on the other serve to contrain the boards horizontally. Two sticks are temporarily inserted under the board pieces to elevate them. Hot hide glue is slathered onto the edge, and then the two boards drop into place with gravity.

 

Here is the follow up on the curly redwood top for the tenor guitar. I went to Cleveland Public Library, where they have a laser engraver in the basement to do some really outlandish cuts -- here some non-sensical dovetails, and a stopped rosette.

Here is the follow up on the curly redwood top for the tenor guitar. I went to Cleveland Public Library, where they have a laser engraver in the basement to do some really outlandish cuts — here some non-sensical dovetails, and a stopped rosette.

 

Another view of the soundboard.

Another view of the soundboard.

 

A close-up of the stopped rosette and soundhole.

See the close-up of the stopped rosette and soundhole.

 

It turns out, I had a whole lot of unjointed wood so I decided to joint it all in one evening -- a little practice to make perfect. This is a little croch walnut for a mandolin, ready to be edge joined.

It turns out, I had a whole lot of unjointed wood so I decided to joint it all in one evening — a little practice to make perfect. This is a little croch walnut for a mandolin, ready to be edge joined.

 

Here we see another close-up of the soundhole and rosette. Hoping to drop some other wood or shell into those slots.

Here we see another close-up of the soundhole and rosette. Hoping to drop some other wood or shell into those slots.

 

Sometimes you clamp boards down with whatever is on hand. In this case, it's most of my smoothing tools... an EC Emmerich smoothing plane, a Stanley knock off, a nice big 22 inch wooden plane, and my random orbital sander.

Sometimes you clamp boards down with whatever is on hand. In this case, it’s most of my smoothing tools… an EC Emmerich smoothing plane, a Stanley knock off, a nice big 22 inch wooden plane, and my random orbital sander.

 

A Sitka spruce soundboard ready to be jointed.

A Sitka spruce soundboard ready to be jointed.

 

 

 

Here I am starting to refine my jointing process with another Sitka spruce top.

Here I am starting to refine my jointing process with another Sitka spruce top.

 

Sanding blow out on the soundhole / rosette + piece of patch wood for said soundhole...

Sanding blow out on the soundhole / rosette + piece of patch wood for said soundhole…

 

Technique refined -- clamping is simple, and uses gravity above the joint of the jointing boards.

Technique refined — clamping is simple, and uses gravity above the joint of the jointing boards.

 

And thus we have a very nicely jointed board Sitka spruce board as a bookmatched pair. It passes the "candling" test handily (hold it up to the light, and look for light gaps).

And thus we have a very nicely jointed board Sitka spruce board as a bookmatched pair. It passes the “candling” test handily (hold it up to the light, and look for light gaps).

 

More smoothing tools as clamps...

More smoothing tools as clamps…

 

 

And here we observe a whole stickered stack of soundboards and backs on top of the basement freezer.

And here we observe a whole stickered stack of soundboards and backs on top of the basement freezer.

I hope you once again enjoyed this non-geo diversion. Until next time… .

Posted in Other | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

And now for something completely different… (guitarmaking by a geo-geek)

Posted by smathermather on December 15, 2014

Guitarmaking (a subset of lutherie) has been an alleged hobby of mine for quite a few years– from the moment I started my first guitar in 1996 or 1997. Over the years, I’ve continue to acquire tools and wood, and started a couple more guitars. I had lots of fire behind my workshop work 7 years ago. And then I got a new and wonderful job. And had a new and wonderful baby boy. And a few years later a new and wonderful baby girl.

Welp, been getting back in the shop in the last few days, and have some pics from assembly. I will build these out over time with explanations, and probably in a separate blog, but for now, you must suffer with unexplained photos re: the mysteries of lute making.

Curly Redwood Top -- jointed and sanded to thickness. This is the face of the future tenor guitar.

Curly Redwood Top — jointed and sanded to thickness. This is the face of the future tenor guitar.

 

Curly Claro walnut back -- unjoined. This will be the back of the tenor guitar.

Curly Claro walnut back — unjoined. This will be the back of the tenor guitar.

 

Joining the curly claro walnut back by cutting along the tops of the board with a plane.

Joining the curly claro walnut back by cutting along the tops of the board with a plane.

 

Curls of walnut from the German E.C. Emmerich Primus Plane.

Curls of walnut from the German E.C. Emmerich Primus Plane.

 

Jointed claro walnut boards reunited.

Jointed claro walnut boards reunited.

 

Animal hide glue, one syringe at a time. Animal hide glue can be a pain to use, but get a cheap hot pot like this, some syringes, and make your hot hide glue on the fly. It works beautifully, saves on lost glue, and gives the ideal joint. Animal hide glue is permanent (lasts hundreds or thousands of years) but will come apart with heat and water, and thus can always be repaired.

Animal hide glue, one syringe at a time. Animal hide glue can be a pain to use, but get a cheap hot pot like this, some syringes, and make your hot hide glue on the fly. It works beautifully, saves on lost glue, and gives the ideal joint. Animal hide glue is permanent (lasts hundreds or thousands of years) but will come apart with heat and water, and thus can always be repaired.

 

Sophisticated clamping devices (a pile of wood with a toolbox on top), framed nicely by a disgusting basement wall.

Sophisticated clamping devices (a pile of wood with a toolbox on top), framed nicely by a disgusting basement wall.

 

And... it was a bad joint, or badly assembled. Some parchment paper and an iron lets me separate and start over with no drama.

And… it was a bad joint, or badly assembled. Some parchment paper and an iron lets me separate and start over with no drama.

And that’s it. I hope you enjoyed. If not, back to Geo posts anyway… .

Posted in Other | Tagged: , , , | 3 Comments »

Korean and Hangul

Posted by smathermather on December 10, 2014

As I am contemplating FOSS4G 2015 (save the date! Seoul, South Korea | SEPTEMBER 14TH – 19TH, 2015) I contemplate what it means to be functionally illiterate for the first time in 30 years.

You see, when, if you are an American born, English and Spanish (kinda) speaking guy and you get dropped into East Asia, there is no alphabet for you to rely on for even the slightest clue about street signs and restaurant names, and everything else.

Now, to be fair, my experience in Seoul this year was not too bad — many signs are written both in English and Korean. But, as I encourage the FOSS4G world to descend upon Korea (especially prompting the Europeans and Americans to go out of their comfort zone a little), I highly encourage a little study of Hangul, the phonetic alphabet of Korea.

Hangul is pretty easy to learn, it’s phonetic (unlike if you try to read Japanese or Chinese), and it will serve you well to study it even a little bit, so you can recognize patterns.

hangul

So, learn some hangul, save the date, and I hope to see you there.

Posted in FOSS4G, FOSS4G2015 | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

And I will fly ten thousand miles…

Posted by smathermather on December 7, 2014

Contemplating FOSS4G 2015, Seoul, South Korea | SEPTEMBER 14TH – 19TH, 2015. It’s only 18 cents a mile to get there from Cleveland, but only 0.11 dollars a kilometer, because the metric system is more economical.

If you need inspiration for your own travels to Korea, Mr. Sanghee Shin has that for you. He starts with technology, food, arts, culture, economic potential, but also solicits your love of booze as incentives to go. I think he might know his audience.

http://www.slideshare.net/endofcap/7-reasons-why-you-should-come-to-foss4g-2015-seoul

Posted in FOSS4G, FOSS4G2015 | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »